Best Essential Oils for Massage Therapy

Alternative medicinal methods have been increasingly popular in recent years, most likely due to the return to naturalistic mindsets that cyclically remerge in pop culture. One of the most popular alternative trends is the frequent use of essential oils in aromatherapy. Aromatherapy is a practice that utilizes various scents to promote well-being and health, and essential oil diffusers have replaced candles as the new method of choice for most clients. The primary benefits of essential oils are to enhance relaxation and reduce stress, which is what makes them a popular choice for massage therapists. Adding aromatherapy with essential oils to your massage practice can be holistically beneficial to the overall experience for your clients. Here are some of the best essential oils to start offering your clients.

Top 5 Essential Oils for Massage Therapists

  1. Lavender Oil

Lavender essential oil is arguably the most popular, and for good reason. It’s a fresh and clean smelling scent that is known to have amazing stress-relieving properties. It’s great for a beginner in the crazy world of essential oils, because it’s generally holistically beneficial and non-offensive to most people. It is usually subtler and creates an environment that feels clean and pure. The floral scent would be amazing if you had a client who was seeking your services due to stress-related tension. In fact, inhaling lavender essential oils has even been proven to treat acute migraine tension. While your massage will be the star of the show in terms of relieving this tension, lavender oil can enhance the overall quality by curating a relaxing atmosphere.

  1. Peppermint Oil 

Peppermint oil is a fresh and nostalgic scent that is known to be amazing for focus, so much so that it’s often used for studying or working. It focuses mainly through its energizing and invigorating properties. We mentioned before how relaxing essential oils can be, but this one has the potential to do the opposite and instead energize your client and help keep them more alert and awake. This oil is ideal for a client that’s feeling drained or lack luster. You want them to feel revitalized after their massage and adding peppermint oil into the appointment can further your impact tremendously.

  1. Eucalyptus Oil 

Eucalyptus oil has many of the same benefits as peppermint oil without the sweetness of the peppermint. If you want your clients to refocus and re-energize without your office smelling like a candy cane, try eucalyptus oil. It is also commonly used to add an alertness to the atmosphere, as it’s often used in meditation practices. Mirroring a meditative atmosphere can enhance the effects of your massage by allowing your client to be more “present” during the appointment.

  1. Basil Oil 

Basil oil is relaxing and refreshing. The herbal scent adds a similar freshness to the room as lavender essential oil. This oil is also recommended if your client needs to relieve some stress or tension. It is additionally said to boost a person’s mood through a series of neuro-signals, making this the perfect choice for a client that needs not only physical aid, but an emotional pick-me-up as well. The combination of the physical and emotional benefits proves that adding basil oil to your appointment could enhance your client’s overall experience in your office.

  1. Cedarwood Oil 

Cedarwood essential oil is a popular choice for aromatherapy in massage due to several relaxing properties. Similar to lavender essential oil, cedarwood has a unique warm smell that’s said to be excellent for sleep aids. While you might not want your client falling asleep on your table, the sleepiness comes from an intense relaxation associated with nighttime routine. It can decompress pressure on the muscles, making the massage easier for you and additionally beneficial for your client.

Why Massage Therapists Should Use Essential Oils

As a massage therapist, you might be wondering why you would include such a non-clinical element into your practice and professional services. Essential oils may not be formal healers, but they have proven benefits, even if they are merely emotional or mood-based. Whether you believe in them or not, their healing properties could be immensely beneficial to your clients if they’re influenced by scent. Overall, no matter what massage services you offer, the environment of your office matters, and aromatherapy can be immensely helpful in curating the most relaxing environment possible.

If you think you’d enjoy helping people to relax and rejuvenate, perhaps a career as a massage therapist is right for you. Contact our Cookeville campus to learn more.